Strong All Season | Pro-Active Medical Care | Dr. Riggs

Strong All Season | Pro-Active Medical Care | Dr. Riggs


Hello, dōTERRA friends. Just wanted to take a quick
moment to address you with all the chaos that’s going on in
the world right now and the craziness, just to kind of help you
understand what’s going on in the world. Particularly right now, as I’ve
spoken with several friends that work in emergency rooms, they’re getting overrun with
people that are curious whether or not they
have a viral infection, as opposed to
needing medical care. And when we do that,
we overrun our medical system, and we don’t leave resources
for those that really need to be seen there. So I want to address that, also maybe signs and symptoms
to look for with COVID-19. I know Dr. Osguthorpe
has been addressing these, and then also maybe some ideas
behind why we’re quarantining and why it’s important
for us to self-quarantine. Let’s start with that
one for a minute. Let me just
give you some statistics, and some of these have
to do with the world stage, and then others that have to do
with just us here in the US. So to give you an example,
Italy on 3/7, so March 7th of this year, had 7,400 cases
or so of COVID-19. As of today,
they’re at about 35, 353 cases. And that includes 2,978 deaths. And of course,
we have great concern, and we’re praying
for those people there. In the US, as of today, we
have 7,038 cases and 97 deaths. So we’re lagging about 12 days
behind where Italy was. And so, as you can, see from
just hearing those statistics, we’re putting some things in
place now that the Italian government, I think, didn’t know to put in
place when they were at 7,000 cases. And so, we’re being able to do
that now to prevent us from getting to where they are. Keep in mind that Italy has a
population of 50 to 70 million patients—or people. And in the US, we’re
at about 350 million people. So very good epidemiologists
and infectious disease doctors have indicated that it’s likely within the
next 12 to 18 months, we’ll have 40 to 70 percent of
the US population infected with COVID-19. And that we’ll likely have
around 1.6 million deaths from this. To give you
some perspective on that, last year for all types
of cancer, we had 600,000 deaths in the United States. So this is a significant thing. And so we’re self-quarantining
to help cause the rise of the disease to not be so
significant in, amongst our population. We’re hearing some very sad
stories out of Europe, where physicians are having to
determine who gets treated with a ventilator and an ICU bed and who does not which means
they’re making life and death decisions, just based upon availability. And so here in the US, we’re
really trying to keep, rather than a steep rise of people
infected with this disease, we’re really trying to keep it
to where we can have this disease go through the
community at a slower pace so that we have resources
available for everyone that does get sick. And so please, as
we recommend self quarantining, as we recommend just being with
your families and working from home, that you don’t take this
opportunity to have playdates with friends and other family
members and have group gatherings in your home. This is really a time to be
conscientious of what we’re doing for the
community as a whole, and that we as individuals need
to take responsibility for what we’re— for our community as a whole
and make sure that we’re not being vectors for
this disease. So some symptoms of COVID-19,
the three that we are commonly seeing right now is fevers, and
that means a temperature greater than 100.4. So a lot of people come in and
say they have a fever, and it’s ninety-nine degrees that is not
by medical definition a fever. So 100.4 or higher, and we’re seeing, typically,
high temperatures of this. One hundred and two, one
hundred and three, one hundred and four degrees. Also cough is a
common symptom of this, as well as shortness of breath. The problem is is that you can
be shedding this virus for two to ten days, even before you come
down with the illness. So again, we’re asking to stay
in your home so that if you happen to be infected with
the virus, but not yet symptomatic, you’re not sharing it with a
number of other people before you, before
you come down ill. So that being said, excuse me, I got to my
nose, oh my goodness. So that being said, let me talk
to you about reasons to call 911, reasons to go
to an emergency room, and reasons to be
going to an urgent care, or calling
your physician’s office. Let’s go with the most serious
ones first: reasons to call 9 11. If someone has stopped
breathing or is choking, and you’re needing to
administer CPR or the Heimlich maneuver, you need to be calling 911. Emergency medicine—emergency
vehicles can get to you faster than you can get that
person to an emergency room. So you call
911 in those moments. A head injury that’s caused the
loss of consciousness or significant confusion is also a
reason to call 911. Severe chest pain and pressure,
as well as a seizure lasting longer than three
to five minutes. All of those reasons, and there
are more, but all of those reasons are the main reasons
that you would want to call 911, as opposed to loading someone
up and trying to get them to an emergency department. So why should you access the
emergency department? Why should you be going in and
seeing an emergency department? If you have significant
difficulty breathing is a good reason. Chest pain, or significant
jaw pain, or arm pain. All of those can be symptoms of
cardiac problems, and women and men
present a little differently. We tend to think of
chest pain for heart attack, and that is a typical
presentation for a man. But women can have a heart
attack and not presenting with any chest pain and only have
jaw pain or left arm pain. So you want to pay attention to
significant pain there, and go to an emergency room. A displaced fracture or
open fracture, so if you’ve broken a bone, and it’s hanging
out of the skin, you need to go
to an emergency room. If you’ve broken bone and
significantly displaced, meaning the arm doesn’t look
normal at all, then, or leg, then you need to
go see an emergency department. Sudden numbness, or weakness, or being unable to speak,
see, walk, or move are symptoms of a stroke. When it comes to stroke and
heart attack, seconds count. There are certain interventions
that we can do if you arrive into an emergency department
within a certain amount of time. If you go outside of that
window of time, let’s just see if the symptom is resolved, let’s see if my
chest pain goes away, Then there are interventions
when you do show up that we cannot administer to you. So when it comes to stroke-like
symptoms and heart attack symptoms you want to access the
emergency department very, very quickly. Bleeding that can’t
be stopped, obviously. Abdominal pain that’s intense
and particularly localized abdominal pain, you want to
access the emergency room. Fevers in anyone that’s less
than three months old is significant. Fevers with convulsions in any
age group, you should seek emergency care, and then coughing
or vomiting blood. Let me just stop for a minute
and tell you one of the challenges that we have is
patients will come from an emergency room and come into
our offices saying, “Well, Dr. Riggs, they didn’t
do anything for me. I still don’t know
what’s going on with me.” And I will tell—what I tell
them is the fact that the emergency room is not meant to
diagnose what’s going on with you. An emergency room is to
determine are you going to live or die from what
you have going on. As long as they can evaluate
and rule out the things that you’re going to die from, they’ll send you back to your
primary care office to be evaluated there to know if—to
figure out what the diagnosis is. And so, please understand the
frustration that you have is that you don’t come away
with a diagnosis when which— what you did pay them for is to
determine are you going to die from what you
have going on today. Some reasons that you might
want to seek care in an urgent care: cough and cold symptoms,
sore throats, rashes, skin irritations, fever or flu-
like symptoms, you can access an urgent care, and then mild injuries, so
sprained ankles, those sorts of things. Urgent cares are fabulous
for that. Primary care offices are
fabulous for that. So, I’ll close by saying
stay safe, stay home. Please make sure that you and
your loved ones are safe. If you’re having difficulty
with staying home, I know that feels very isolated
and the challenges that come with that. Please use Skype, and Zoom,
and phone, and just reach out to other people, grandparents,
etc. and speak with them that way, so that you have that social
interaction while you’re doing a self-isolation and can remain
mentally healthy and help keep the community physically so,
physically healthy. So, appreciate you all. Love you all. And best of luck
in the coming weeks.