Day 4 – Cardiac Arrest: Georgetown High School Medical Summer Program

Day 4 – Cardiac Arrest: Georgetown High School Medical Summer Program


– [Voiceover] This morning
we went into a room, we had a patient lying on a bed, and… – [Voiceover] They literally
threw you in a room, and they told you, like, to figure out what was wrong with them. And the patient didn’t know what was wrong with herself, either. – [Voiceover] It could breathe, it had blood on it, like, bruising, and there’s a pulse in the mannequin. – [Voiceover] It had injuries.
Its head was bleeding. And you had to, like, take all the vitals. And you had the option to call the doctor. And as you walked up to the patient, it actually started talking. – [Voiceover] You just ask it a question, and it answers back. It was like a little
back-and-forth between. Then, you try to see what it’s
like to actually take care of a patient, and we
were trying to figure out what was wrong with her,
she was in a car crash. – [Voiceover] It’s all
real equipment, so they can program it to say exactly
what it wants to do. The oxygen, like, you hear it. It actually goes through to the person. You have to arrange the levels,
like, if you do it wrong, it shows on the screen. – [Voiceover] They give
you a really cool sense of what it’s like to be in a hospital room on the other side of the bed. We were talking with a patient, and she started to go unconscious, and then, she went into cardiac arrest, so that means, like, her heart stopped, she stopped breathing,
and we had to start CPR. – [Voiceover] Not everyone
there knew how to do CPR, so in 30 seconds, you
learned how to do it. – [Voiceover] 30
compressions, two breaths. 30 compressions, two breaths. And how tiring it actually is. And how important it is for people to keep switching around
to keep everything moving, keep the patient getting the best care. Then we, well, brought
her back to life, I guess. It was definitely a more realistic idea compared to what I’ve seen already. – [Voiceover] I know
that I don’t really want to work trauma because, I don’t know, I just don’t see myself as enjoying that. I would definitely rather
meet the patient prior and, like, explain to them what’s about to be done to them. – [Voiceover] So far,
through this whole thing, I’ve actually decided I really
do want to do this more. You just, like, kind
of, just take a breath, and then you just kind of remember, like, “Oh, I need to do this now.” I just had to do it. I’m Brian Elway. I live just
outside of Philadelphia, and I’m a rising senior in high school. – [Voiceover] My name is Rhianna Padron from Miami, Florida,
and I’m a rising junior in high school.