Chronically Ill Person Reacts to Coronavirus Myths [CC]

Chronically Ill Person Reacts to Coronavirus Myths [CC]


Hello lovely people, The novel coronavirus epidemic is a double
outbreak: the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the disease covid-19, but
also a pandemic of misinformation. In moments of heightened tension, misinformation can
sometimes be worse than a virus. Panic induced rumours can result in a phenomenon
known as “the worried well”, where people who don’t have the virus read something
silly online like “all people with an index finger longer than their ring finger are carriers
for coronavirus, everyone else is safe” Then overwhelm the health system which reduces
its ability to care for those who genuinely need treatment. Misinformation can also have the opposite
effect, meaning people who DO have the virus think they’re totally safe because their
Aunt Susan shared a Facebook post that says if you were born on a Monday you’re fine
and don’t have to practice social distancing because you’re basically half mermaid anyway. They then blithely skip around touching stuff
with their infected hands and spreading the virus everywhere before their actual symptoms
kick in 2 to 10 days later because, wow, half merpeople are not a thing. Unfortunately whilst there is no known cure
for Coronavirus a number of myths have been spreading around and it’s those we’ll
be busting today! Some are useless but some are downright dangerous! If you’re watching this video in the near-or-distant
future when this whole ‘oh my god is this the apocalypse?!’ thing has blown over then
cheers to you! Also, really relieved you still have the internet. – because obviously that’s the real worry
(!) If you’re new to this channel, hi, that’s
sarcasm. Please subscribe. Not sarcasm. I’m Jessica, a chronically ill person who makes
educational yet sassy videos about life with illness, disability and… gayness. Not that my life would be that different if
I was straight. I must be in a parallel universe somewhere… Wow, I’m so gay I can’t even imagine being
straight. I thought it was important to make a video
about the coronavirus, firstly because it’s all that anyone can talk about at the moment
so not talking about it seems strange- – I had a really fun video that was meant
to come out today but instead will be coming out on Friday. Because we need entertainment
in difficult times too. And secondly, because, as someone who deals
with being ill every single day, watching healthy people panic about the possibility
of being so is very trippy. You don’t seem to be helping yourselves out either as there
is a lot of passing misinformation around. And thus, we’re going to break down the
biggest myths currently floating around about the virus whilst reminding you: [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. Because sometimes you just need a very British
person to tell you to CALM DOWN. Also, I’m in the ‘at risk’ category
of people and even if the virus just gives you some mild, flu-like symptoms, you passing
it to me could actually kill me. So don’t do that. Thanks. I’ve already had pneumonia. It sucked worse
than anything. And I never, never, EVER, want to have it ever again. I’ll start with a massive disclaimer that
I’m not a doctor, just an ill person who spends a lot of time in her house researching
things on the internet. My myth-busting information has been gathered from medical professionals
and briefings from the World Health Organisation who you should listen to- – Who actually do know more than your kooky
Aunt Susan who shares Facebook posts about gargling bleach. Who knew (!) Oh Susan… Myth: Holding your breath without coughing
means you don’t have the virus. NO. No. According to social media, if you take a deep
breath, hold it for 10 second and don’t cough then you have no fibrosis or infection
in the lungs and thus don’t have the coronavirus so you’re free to go about your merry way. HOWEVER, according to the American Lung Foundation,
fibrosis or scarring of the lungs can occur due to infections, medications, genetics or
diseases but whilst being unable to hold your breath for 10 seconds without coughing MAY
occur when you have fibrosis, it is not a key diagnostic tool. Additionally, as we should all know by now,
you don’t need to have lung fibrosis to have coronavirus, you don’t even need any
symptoms at all! Sidenote: Don’t glare at people in public
when they cough, okay? They may just have an allergy, or asthma. – You can glare at them if they don’t cover
their mouth when they cough though, that’s just not nice in any circumstance. If you are having breathing difficulties you
should seek urgent medical care but please remember that just because you started coughing
whilst holding your breath for 10 seconds, that does not mean you definitely have the
virus or that, even if you do, it will cause irreversible damage like fibrosis. Myth: coronavirus only affects older people People of all ages can be infected by the
new coronavirus. Older people and those of all ages with pre-existing medical conditions,
particularly those that have an impact on their respiratory or immune functions do appear
to be more vulnerable to becoming severely ill but young people can also become ill or
carry the virus. So: [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. Myth: antibiotics will protect against the
virus No. But at least you’ve moved on from gargling
bleach. Antibiotics do not work against viruses, only
bacteria. Antibiotics should not be used as a means of prevention or treatment in the case of coronavirus. However
if you are hospitalised you may receive antibiotics due to a bacterial coinfection. Myth: drinking water every 15 minutes flushes
out the virus There is currently a post going around Facebook
which recommends drinking water every 15 minutes to flush out any virus that might have entered
the mouth. So it will go into your stomach. And be killed by your natural acids. Which is not a thing. Also what, the people who are infected
do not drink ever? Professor Trudie Lang at University of Oxford
says there is “no biological mechanism” for washing a respiratory virus down into
your stomach to kill it. They enter the body when you breathe them in and, yes, some of
them might go into your mouth but drinking won’t prevent it from getting in through
your nose… or eyes… or mouth even. Still, staying hydrated is good for your immune
system. Myth: drinking hot tea kills the virus So why are English people getting it? There are a lot of different ‘heat kills
the virus’ recommendations: from taking hot baths, to drinking hot water to blowing
a hairdryer in your face. All falsely attributed to Unicef. Poor Unicef Trying to heat your body or expose it to the
sun- – how are you going to expose your lungs to
the sun? Is completely ineffective as once the virus
is in your body we don’t yet have a way of killing it. Your body just has to fight
it off. According to current scientific research,
the temperature needed to actively kill the virus is around 60 degrees Celsius or 140
degrees Fahrenheit. That’s far hotter than any bath you want to sit in. But if someone
in your house might be infected you should wash your bed linen and towels at 60 degrees. But please don’t burn your skin. Sadly, tea can’t do much since it doesn’t
actually change your body temperature, which remains stable unless you’re ill. – as someone who has an illness that means
I cannot regulate my body temperature very well and it thus doesn’t remain stable I
would just like to say: you should be very grateful for that! Hand Dryers don’t actually kill the virus
either, I’m afraid: [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. Myth: the virus will go away when the weather
gets warmer Tell that to Kenya. Whilst we already know that the flu virus
doesn’t survive well outside the body during the summer, we don’t yet really know how
heat impacts the new coronavirus. Other than it appears to spread happily in hot and humid
conditions, just as it does in cold and dry ones. No, it won’t go away if it starts to snow. But at least we’ll be less likely to go
to the pub so social isolation might actually have a chance of working. Dr Marc LIpsitch at the Centre for Communicable
Disease Dynamics at the Harvard School of Public Health says that while we do expect
to see some slowing in the contagiousness of COVID-19 as the weather warms it is not
likely to be significant enough to slow transmission of the virus. Again: the human body temperature remains
around 36.5 degrees Celsius to 37 degrees Celsius regardless of the external temperature
or weather, which is not hot enough to defeat the virus so… [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. Yes I’m going to keep playing that. Myth: spraying alcohol or chlorine over your
body will cure you of the virus – Ouch. That sounds painful. Don’t do that. Spraying any kind of disinfectant over your
skin will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. However, it can be very
harmful to your mucous membranes like your eyes and mouth. You CAN use them to disinfect surfaces around
you however, which IS recommended to keep the virus at bay. Myth: eating garlic will prevent the infection Tell that to Italy and China. Two countries
that use a lot of garlic in their cuisines and yet… It’s a virus, not a vampire. The World Health Organisation says that while
garlic is a healthy food with some antimicrobial properties there is no evidence that it can
protect people from the new coronavirus. It will make you smell though. And the South China Morning Post reported
a story of a woman who needed hospital treatment for a severely inflamed throat after consuming
1.5kg of raw garlic. So garlic won’t protect you. [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. Similarly: Myth: vitamin C and other supplements can
combat coronavirus Whilst there is evidence that certain health
supplements can help boost your immune system, they cannot specifically fight off infections
like the coronavirus or spur on a speedy recovery. In fact, for most people, taking extra vitamin
C does not even ward off the common cold, though it may shorten the duration of a cold
if you catch one – and most people are able to obtain all of
their necessary vitamins and minerals through a healthy diet so please don’t be talked
into spending lots of money you don’t need to. Please eat fruit and vegetables if you can. The saddest thing is that some people are
profiting off this belief. A certain YouTuber and influencer, who will remain nameless in
order to stop trafficking attention to them, has taken this opportunity to peddle a ‘miracle’
supplement that is said to ‘wipe out’ the new coronavirus. This supplement contains
chlorine dioxide – a bleaching agent. Please do not take any miracle cures suggested
by the internet, you’re smarter than that. I’m going to throw ‘drinkable silver’
in here as well. The use of colloidal silver was promoted on a US televangelist’s show.
A guest claimed that the solution kills some strains of coronavirus within 12 hours (but
also admitted it hadn’t been tested on COVID-19). Didn’t stop it immediately being put on
sale on Facebook! Although, bless them, Facebook does now put a warning up on their posts. Unlike iron or zinc, silver is not a metal
that has any function in the human body. Although there are some occasional uses of silver in
healthcare, for example in bandages applied to wounds, but that doesn’t mean it’s effective
to consume and it could cause some serious side effects including kidney damage, seizures
and argyria – a condition that makes your skin turn blue. Which is at least interesting. Myth: if you have a runny nose, you probably
just have a common cold. The common cold and seasonal flu are viral
infections that can have very similar, even identical symptoms to COVID-19 including fever,
cough and shortness of breath. Uncommon symptoms include dizziness, nausea, vomiting and a
runny nose. HOWEVER it’s important to bear in mind that the virus presents differently
in different people. This goes along with the myth that ‘if you have the coronavirus,
you’ll know’ because, no, you won’t. Early on, infected people may show no symptoms
at all. And just because you don’t have the same
symptoms as someone else who had coronavirus doesn’t mean you don’t have it. If you
feel unwell for any reason, you should take precautions to avoid infecting others. The
symptoms of coronavirus are not specific and something that feels mild to you can cause
significant sickness in someone who is at high risk for infections. – hi. That’s me. And the elderly or ill
people in your life. Please don’t leave the house when you have
all the symptoms of coronavirus JUST because you have a runny nose. There is nothing that
says you can’t have the virus AND a cold. Or the virus AND hayfever. Think. It. Through. And wash your hands! [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. Myth: positivity will stop the infection. Oh. Oh honey, no. Put it down. Step away.
Get some help! Myth: face masks can protect you from the
virus Yes, I made you watch all the way to this
point before addressing the most obvious myth. Standard surgical masks cannot protect you
from the virus as they are not designed to block out viral particles and do not lay flush
to the face. BUT they can help prevent you from spreading it around, should you be infected,
by blocking respiratory droplets from your mouth. There ARE some respirator facemasks, ‘N95
respirators’ that can greatly reduce the spread of the virus to the wearer but training
is required to fit them so no air can sneak around the edges. Also: please stop asking your dentist to borrow
face masks. They actually need them for work and they may only have a set amount. And if
you’re in England then that’s NHS money you’re trying to ‘borrow’. Also, also: panic buying and hoarding facemasks
means that chronically ill people who rely on them to leave the house cannot then have
them. So please think through your actions before stocking up unnecessarily. Myth: you’re less likely to get COVID-19
than the flu. Meh. Not necessarily. Live Science reports that to estimate how
easily a virus spreads, scientists calculate its “basic reproduction number,” or R0 (or
R-nought). R0 predicts the number of people who can catch a given bug from a single infected
person. Currently, the R0 for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease COVID-19,
is estimated at about 2.2, meaning a single infected person will infect about 2.2 others,
on average. By comparison, the flu has an R0 of 1.3. Most importantly, while no vaccine yet exists
to prevent COVID-19, the seasonal flu vaccine prevents influenza relatively well. Think
about all those people who get it and don’t die. Because the flu is not ‘worse’ than COVID-19,
it’s just more common. And it doesn’t kill more people because percentages are a
thing! I know we’ve been a little heavy so far,
because I really, really want to stress how serious the virus is but I also don’t want
to panic you so: Myth: Getting COVID-19 is a death sentence Around 80% of people who are infected with
the coronavirus have mild cases of COVID-19, according to a study by the Chinese Centre
for Disease Control and Prevention. About 13.8% report severe illness, meaning they
have shortness of breath, or require supplemental oxygen, and about 4.7% are critical, meaning
they face respiratory failure, multi-organ failure or septic shock. HOWEVER, If you’re not in the most at-risk
categories, you DO have a duty of care to those who are. So start social distancing
and remember: [PSA] The best way to protect yourself
against COVID-19 is by frequently cleaning your hands. By doing this you eliminate viruses
that may be on your hands and avoid infection that could occur by then touching your eyes,
mouth, and nose. And finally, because this isn’t an excuse
for blatant racism: Myth: it’s unsafe to be around Chinese people,
Chinese food or packages from China. Throw anyone calling this the ‘Chinese Virus’
into the blender of doom! Simply having Chinese or Asian heritage does
not make you more susceptible to having the virus and CLEARLY does not mean you automatically
have it. The virus is not tied to ethnicity, despite the internet rumours that darker skin
makes you immune: – dear universe, please help Idris Elba recover
well. Chinese food will also not pass the virus
on to you. If you’re following that logic, you should be avoiding Italian, Korean, Japanese,
Spanish AND Persian restaurants. Actually, to be fair, you SHOULD be avoiding
all restaurants. It’s called ‘social distancing’ AND IT’S GOING TO SAVE LIVES. However, a lot of locally based Chinese restaurants
and businesses are struggling right now so if you’re wondering what to eat tonight
please consider a Chinese takeaway… just ask that the delivery person leaves it at
your front door. When it comes to packages, according to the
World Health Organisation, research has found that coronaviruses don’t survive long on
objects such as letters and packages. Although it can stay on surfaces such as metal, glass
or plastic for as long as nine days, the surfaces present in packaging are not ideal for the
virus to survive, rather, the coronavirus is thought to be most commonly spread through
respiratory droplets. That’s when you cough and spit on other people. I hope you’ve found this video helpful,
if so please share it with your friends and family to bust some myths. It’s important not to panic, but
to prepare and educate yourself based on science and research. Thank you for watching, subscribe if you haven’t
already, and I’ll see you in my next video. [kiss] And yes this is a nurse’s cape from World
War II and I finally have an excuse to wear it!