Can I Eat Potatoes With Diabetes ?

Can I Eat Potatoes With Diabetes ?


– Hi, Toby Smithson here
with Diabetes EveryDay. Please remember to hit
the subscribe button to be a part of this
journey to good health while managing diabetes. In today’s episode of “Can I Eat This?” we are going to take a look at a frequently feared carbohydrate
containing food: potatoes. Before we review just how
many carbs are in potatoes, I’d like to point out some
of the nutrition benefits. Potatoes are high in potassium. And for those with celiac
disease, potatoes are gluten-free. For people with diabetes,
here’s a possible aha moment. Potatoes contain resistant starch, especially when they are
cooked and then cooled, as in possibly a potato salad. The starch is not completely
broken down and fully absorbed which helps slow down a
rise in blood sugar levels. Okay, let’s look at a
portion and its carb content. To get this right, I use
my trusty food scale. So, a baking potato 2-1/2
inches by 4-3/4 inches, 156 grams or 5.5 ounces. What you see here, the portion
size for the 34 grams of carb and two grams of fiber
is half of this potato. Red potatoes. 2-1/4 inch by 3-1/4 inch. 173 grams or six ounces. That gives you a 34 gram
carb, three grams fiber. And a sweet potato. Large, 180 grams or almost 6.5 ounces. This potato, again, half of
what I’m showing you here is equal to 37 grams of
carb, six grams of fiber. Potatoes are a versatile starchy vegetable and can be served for
breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Here’s a tip. When I’m planning my dinner, I will use potato as my
carbohydrate source for the meal alongside a lower carbohydrate vegetable, like broccoli or cauliflower, and balance it out on my plate
with a source of protein, like chicken, fish, cheese, or eggs. Here’s to your health.