Brady’s Story – Perthes Disease

Brady’s Story – Perthes Disease


(upbeat music) – [Tara] The very first time I noticed it, I was dropping him off for school, and we stopped at the bottom of the hill, and I told him, “go ahead and run up the sidewalk.” And he started to run, and
he stopped and turned around, and he said, “I can’t run.” – [Kevin] We thought
maybe he had just, like, pulled a muscle or something. And so, after a couple of weeks he continued to do it, so we took him into the
doctor to do an X-ray. – [Tara] I knew immediately
that there was a problem, because it wasn’t like Brady. He was constantly moving. (upbeat music) I found out on Mother’s Day, actually, that he had Perthes. And she told me we have, you know, I need to tell you something, and she called me, it was kind of frightening, she called me at, like, 7:00,
8:00 at night to tell me, and she explained it, I immediately started researching, trying to see what all it involved. – When we came here, talking
to Dr. Kim about everything, we felt comfortable that
this is what we need to do, and we really felt comfortable he was the best person to do it. – So, this is a child
with Perthes disease, which means a disease where blood flow to the hip somehow got disrupted. We don’t know what did it. Initially, we were thinking
of operating on him, doing what we call an osteotomy, which means to cut the
bone and re-angle it. So this is a MRI scan of
Brady before treatment, and what we saw was that he already had pretty good blood flow to the femoral head, and that made us change our
mind about doing an operation. Instead, we thought that he
could be treated with a cast, so we put this Petrie cast. How you been? – Good. – The concept of the Petrie cast is that you put the ball
part of the hip joint into the socket by getting
the leg out in that position. By doing that, you’re trying to round off the head from a flat shape to a more rounder shape. So he’ll be in that cast for six weeks, the cast will be removed and
then we’ll put a brace on, which will be part time, so he’ll have it on for
about 12 hours initially for about three months, then he’ll decrease the brace wear to about eight hours a day. Yeah, it looks like it’s coming around. Nice and round. So I’m going to discontinue the brace. You don’t have to wear the
brace anymore at night. Is that good? – What about at day? – Even at days. No brace. – No brace. – No brace at all. – Yay! – Okay, no brace, go back to school. – Does that mean I’m out of my brace? – Yeah! – Yay! – Okay? – Doing great. Doing so much better. Since he’s gone back to school, Now he’s enjoying time with his friends, and it’s still kind of
hard to keep him still, and keep him from running. – Good job. Alright. Good! Now what kind of sports
was he doing before? – Baseball, basketball, – [Tara] He never really actually played in any leagues or anything. – Okay, so just for fun?
– Well I played baseball at my house. – So you could probably do baseball. – When we came in, not knowing what to expect, But it’s been awesome. It really has been awesome. It’s been a great experience. – The doctors, the staff, everybody at Scottish Rite, is just awesome. – I’d say coming here, and being involved with Scottish Rite, there’s a peace about it because you know they’re
doing the right thing, they’re going to do what’s best. – My leg is amazing, I’m not limping, everything that Scottish
Rite has done for me, I just wanna say thank you to Dr. Kim, because I wouldn’t have
done it without him. (upbeat music) – [Narrator] Texas Scottish
Rite Hospital for Children, giving children back their childhood.